Prevention and treatment of venous disorders during pregnancy and the postpartum period

Djordje RADAK1,2,3; Slobodan TANASKOVIC1,2 University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium Abstract Chronic venous disease represents one of the most frequent medical conditions that could be observed in the general population. Pregnancy is one of the major predisposing factors for developing venous insufficiency due to an enlarged gravid uterus, which obstructs pelvic venous outflow, and an increase in hormone secretion, which weakens the vein wall. A clinical examination and Doppler ultrasound evaluation are used to diagnose venous insufficiency during pregnancy; these clinical findings can vary from insignificant telangiectases to severe varicose veins and skin damage. The relative risk of a venous thromboembolism (VTE)…

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Testing the potential risk of developing chronic venous disease: Phleboscore®

Testing the potential risk of developing chronic venous disease: Phleboscore® Philippe BLANCHEMAISON, MD 113, avenue Victor Hugo, 75116-Paris, France Abstract Chronic venous disorders (CVD), a highly prevalent problem among populations worldwide, with which both general practitioners and specialists have to deal, include symptoms (leg pain, leg heaviness, and other types of discomfort) and signs as described in the Clinical, Etiological, Anatomical, and Pathophysiological (CEAP) classification. Symptoms appear early in the progression of the disease and with time may be associated with clinical signs of increasing severity. CVD is a chronic disorder that significantly alters the quality of life for the…

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Combined hormonal contraceptives and the subsequent risk of a venous thromboembolism

Combined hormonal contraceptives and the subsequent risk of a venous thromboembolism Christian Jamin Gynecologist Paris, France Abstract Recent public alarm in European countries has renewed concerns about the safety of oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) after women sued manufacturers for potentially fatal venous thromboembolisms resulting from using OCPs (particularly those combining estrogen and the new generations of progestin). Earlier studies, reporting an increased risk of venous thromboembolisms, produced conflicting results and had methodological limitations, calling into question the validity of the findings and conclusions about the magnitude of the additional risk associated with using the new progestin-containing contraceptives. Finally, the World…

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